2017-07-17

Trek Moderne is #NotMyTrek

Ugh.


(Note:  This is an out-of-order piece amidst a series of unpublished articles, so please take it with the mind that there is a greater body of work to which this is attached.)

Where the hell did the saucer pieces go, and why?  It wouldn't reduce the mass, because now you have to bulk up the structure at the four skinny points, you've added a large surface area that must be covered in exterior hull, et cetera.

 I mean, a certain adventurousness in design is something that we've seen among many races since TOS . . . the long-necked Klingon battlecruiser, the Constitution nacelle pylons and slender neck, et cetera.  Even the Vulcan cruisers in Enterprise with their warp rings secured only at the bottom were adventurously illogical, one would think.  It gives a certain feel of tech advancement, stylistically . . . "we are SO more advanced than you" . . . just as the Probert-TNG featured all that curving and swooping in the somewhat bulkier designs.  This was largely lost in the blockier late-TNG era's bulkier bulkiness, save for the unoriginal E-E, which was the result of a kinky one-night stand between Probert's A and D with sharp objects.

 But then we come back to this. I don't mind a bridge dome as a dome-dome . . . that was neat on the ship teaser and I have dug that in other designs. However, this ship is the epitome of blockiness, what with the rectangular nacelles and blocky triangle engineering hull.  To then have this weirdness going on with the saucer is as irrationally incongruous as Church's sweeping Monsterprise secondary bits attached to a bigger, squatter, less graceful saucer.

In short, it fits perfectly amidst the crap that is Trek Moderne.

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