2014-06-26

Demo - Accelerating Away at 1000g

First, here's an alternate version of the 20g video from the last post . . . this one has the framerate dropped a bit and some other tweaks that make the overall motion feel a little smoother.

With that out of the way, let's now check out the ships zipping off at 1000g.

video

Download the 1000g acceleration video here.

The same caveats apply insofar as positional accuracy only being true at interval seconds.  However, one clearly gets the sense, even at 640 by 480, that any small ship is just gone like a bat out of hell.   With the first frame of motion at 10fps, the Y-wing and TIE are barely-discernible smudges.   Even the Enterprise-D is virtually nothing after two or three seconds of motion.

Now, just so you have a sense of things, here's the way it plays out.  (Again, this is not 1000g precisely, but 10000m/s^2, a two percent difference.)

0s - 0m (not counting the fifty meters of the camera's distance from the tails of most of the ships.)
1s - 5000m (5km)
2s - 20km
3s - 45km
4s - 80km
5s - 125km
6s - 180km
7s - 245km
8s - 320km
9s - 405km
10s - 500km

At the tenth second, the vessel would be moving at 100000 m/s, or 100 kilometers per second.  Per Celestia, planets would visibly grow or shrink (albeit slowly) at that velocity when within 20 or 30 thousand kilometers.

Compare that to the 20g (200m/s^2) positions, which of course are fifty times less:

0s - 0m (not counting the fifty meters of the camera's distance from the tails of most of the ships.)
1s - 100m
2s - 400m
3s - 900m
4s - 1600m (1.6km)
5s - 2.5km
6s - 3.6km
7s - 4.9km
8s - 6.4km
9s - 8.1km
10s - 10km


No comments:

Post a Comment